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Activities by Grade Level

Elementary

Map It
Like a Puzzle
Storytellers
Chalk Stenciled Landscapes
    Interdisciplinary Extensions
    Connections to the Collection
William Zorach –Plowing the Fields
    Interdisciplinary Extensions

Map It
On a map of New Hampshire, have students identify the White Mountain region that Jasper Cropsey depicts in his paintings.

New Hampshire History Topic: Boundaries

Like a Puzzle

Every painting is divided into areas. These areas are called the foreground, middle ground and background. Work with your students to define these words and then identify the foreground, middle ground and background of the Cropsey paintings. What do they notice in each? Do the parts of the painting remind them of a puzzle? In what way?

New Hampshire History Topic: Self-Expression

Language Arts: Standard 3, Opportunities for speaking, listening, viewing

Storytellers
Have your students imagine that they are able to step inside one of the Cropsey paintings. Have them make up a story based on what they feel, smell, see, hear and notice. Are they by themselves or with others? Share the story with the rest of the class and e-mail them to the Currier Museum of Art – we would love to read all of the stories!

New Hampshire History Topic: Self-Expression

Language Arts: Standard 2, Using artworks as catalysts for writing

Chalk Stenciled Landscapes
Grade
4th grade and above

Aim/Instructional Objective:

  1. To learn what a landscape is and to be able to distinguish it from other works of art.
  2. To gain a better understanding of how an artist’s surroundings often serve as a source of subject matter in their artwork.

See student examples >

Materials/Supplies Needed

  • Pencil
  • 12 x 18” white paper
  • 12 x 18” manila paper
  • Chalk pastels or soft colored chalk
  • Paper towels
  • Scissors
  • Thin black markers (optional)

Length – (2) 45-50 minute class periods

Procedure

  1. Introduction begins with a discussion of what a landscape is. Examples are shown with particular emphasis on New Hampshire landscapes in the Currier collection.
  2. Through brainstorming, a list is generated of other New Hampshire locations that may lend themselves to the art of landscape painting.
  3. Finally, following a demonstration of the technique and sharing of completed samples, students:
  4. Tear manila paper (experimentation with controlled tearing is helpful).
  5. Apply heavy line of chalk to torn edge.
  6. Align manila with white paper. Using a paper towel rub chalk on to white paper.
  7. Continue to tear manila, apply chalk and rub on to white to create overlapping rows of color to represent sky, water, mountains, pasture, etc. until the entire white paper is covered.
  8. Black marker may be used to depict small silhouettes on top of chalk, to serve as visual clues such as birds in the sky, sailboat in the lake, tower on the mountain range, etc. This step is completely optional.

Note – Manila paper can be torn or cut in a variety of directions to create needed shapes. Remember that when stenciling, it is the hole of the shape that is chalked not the torn or cut out shape itself. This is important for things like mountain ranges, sun, clouds, trees, etc.

Corresponding Standards
National Standards

  • Content Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes.
  • Content Standard 2: Using knowledge of structures and functions.
  • Content Standard 3: Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas to communicate meaning.
  • Content Standard 5: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

New Hampshire Standards

  • Standard 1: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.
  • Standard 4: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.
  • Standard 5: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and other’s artwork.

Assessment

  1. Did the student create a landscape containing components that lead the viewer to believe it could be in New Hampshire?
  2. Does the student’s work illustrate an understanding of the use of materials and technique demonstrated?

New Vocabulary Words
Foreground – the part of a scene or picture that is nearest to and in front of the viewer.
Background – the part of a pictorial representation that appears to be in the distance and that provides relief for the principal objects in the foreground.
Middle ground – the part of a scene or picture that is between the foreground and the background.
Horizon – the apparent intersection of the earth and sky as seen by an observer.
Perspective – the appearance of objects in depth.

Interdisciplinary Extensions

  1. Social Studies/Geography: study of New Hampshire – characteristics of land, foliage indigenous to region, mountain ranges, bodies of water.
  2. Language Arts: poems of Robert Frost

Connections to the Currier Museum of Art’s collection

Additional Information & Resources

Photographs of New Hampshire (one’s own, calendar pictures, postcards, newspaper and magazine)

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William Zorach – Plowing the Fields
Grade
Grade 3/Upper Elementary   

Aim/Instructional Objectives

  1. Students will learn how to mix shades and tints.
  2. Students will learn about Fauvism.

See student examples >

Materials/Supplies Needed

  • Tempera paints: black, white, green, orange, yellow, brown, blue
  • Water buckets
  • Brushes in assorted sizes
  • 12 x 18" white construction paper
  • Visuals of farms and fields (calendars work well)
  • Map of New Hampshire
  • Black fine point markers
  • Painting smocks

Length – (3) 50-minute periods

Procedure

  WEEK # 1:

  1. Discuss background on William Zorach.
  2. Show visuals and discuss.
  3. Put name and class code on back of 12 x 18" white construction paper.
  4. Use green tempera paint to block in or outline hills and fields.
  5. Mix colors and paints each section a different color (shades and tints).
  6. Place in drying rack to dry.

  WEEK #2:

  1. Paint the sky a light grayish blue with streaks of a darker color.
  2. Continue painting the fields.
  3. Place in drying rack to dry.

  WEEK #3:

  1. Observe Zorach’s painting and paint trees in foreground, using triangular shapes and round shapes.
  2. Observe Zorach’s painting and paint bare branched trees in the middle ground along with farmers plowing the field with horses.
  3. Paint cows or sheep in one of the fields.
  4. Place in drying rack to dry.

Corresponding Standards
National Standards

  • Content Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes.
  • Content Standard 2: Using knowledge of structures and functions.
  • Content Standard 3: Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas.
  • Content Standard 4: Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.
  • Content Standard 5: Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

New Hampshire Standards

  • Standard 1: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.
  • Standard 2: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.
  • Standard 3: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.
  • Standard 4: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.
  • Standard 5: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others’ work.
  • Standard 7: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Assessment

  1. Did the student create a Zorach inspired painting?
  2. Did the student use media correctly?
  3. Did the student demonstrate an understanding of Zorach’s painting technique in the outlining of the hills?
  4. Did the student mix shades and tints to create new greens and browns?

New Vocabulary Words
A tint is made by taking white and adding a small amount of color.  The more color added, the stronger the tint.
A shade is made by adding black to a color.
Foreground – the part of a scene or picture that is nearest to and in front of the viewer.
Fauvism an art movement launched in the early 20 th century with work characterized by bright, non-natural colors and simple forms; Henri Matisse and Georges Rouault were leaders of this group.
Background – the part of a pictorial representation that appears to be in the distance and that provides relief for the principal objects in the foreground.
Middle ground –
the part of a scene or picture that is between the foreground and the background.

Interdisciplinary Extensions

  1. Science: study of cloud formations                
  2. Social Studies: study of NH artist colonies
  3. Language Arts: write a story about the people in rural NH

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Jasper Francis Cropsey, Winter Landscape, North Conway, NH, 1859
Jasper Francis Cropsey, Winter Landscape, North Conway, NH, 1859
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Jasper Francis Cropsey, An Indian Summer Morning in the White Mountains, 1857
Jasper Francis Cropsey, An Indian Summer Morning in the White Mountains, 1857
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Albert Bierstadt, Moat Mountain Intervale, New Hampshire, circa 1862
Albert Bierstadt, Moat Mountain, Intervale, New Hampshire, c. 1862
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Sophia Towne Darrah, Mount Chocorua, New Hampshre, 1856
Sophia Towne Darrah, Mount Chocorua, New Hampshire, 1856
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William Zorach, Plowing the Fields, 1917
William Zorach, Plowing the Fields, 1917
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